Germanwatch Global Climate Risk Report

Germanwatch, a research group for sustainable development and global equity, has released its 9th Global Climate Risk report to coincide with the climate summit 2013 in Warsaw, Poland. The summit began on Monday, with representatives of around 190 countries to discuss approaches to climate change beyond 2020.

About the report, Germanwatch says;

Regarding future climate change, the Climate Risk Index may serve as a red flag for already existing vulnerability that may further increase in regions, where extreme events will become more frequent or more severe due to climate change. While some vulnerable developing countries are frequently hit by extreme events, there are also some others where such disasters are a rare occurrence.

The Germanwatch report can be found here, and includes 3 sets of statistics of particular interest:

  • Climate Risk Index for 2012
  • The Long-Term Climate Risk Index 1993 to 2012
  • Record-breaking meteorological events since 2000

2012 Climate Risk Index

The Climate Risk Index for 2012 has the ten most affected countries as:

  • Haiti
  • Philippines
  • Pakistan
  • Madagascar
  • Fiji
  • Serbia
  • Samoa
  • Bosnia and Herzogovina
  • Russia
  • Nigeria

Many of the above countries have appeared on the list before. Madagascar however, hasn’t been on the “Down 102 list since 2008. Last year’s severe Tropical Storm Irina and Intense Tropical Cyclone Giovanna, which killed over 100 people, means that the country is now back on the list. The severe floods in 2012 in Nigeria and and the hottest summer in 40 years in Bosnia and Herzogovina means those 2 countries are on the list for the first time.

Climate Risk Index 1993 to 2012

The Long-Term Climate Risk Index 1993 to 2012 has the ten most affected countries as:

  • Honduras
  • Myanmar
  • Haiti
  • Nicaragua
  • Bangladesh
  • Vietnam
  • Philippines
  • Dominican Republic
  • Mongolia
  • Thailand = Guatemala

The Long Term Climate Risk Index (CRI) takes into account the death toll and economic losses of extreme weather events, as well as the total number of events.

 

Climte Risk INdex 1993 to 2012
Germanwatch Climte Risk Index 1993 to 2012

Record Breaking Meteorological events since 2000

Below we have picked out those events listed in the Germanwatch report that are a result of flooding and high rainfall only. Each event listed also shows the confidence level that it can be attributed to climate change.

  • Colombia (2010) Heaviest rains since records started in 1969
  • Impact Costs: 47 deaths, 80 missing
  • Confidence in attribution to climate change: Low to Medium
  • England and Wales (2000) Wettest autumn on record since 1766. Several short-term rainfall records
  • Impact Costs: ~£1.3 billion
  • Confidence in attribution to climate change: Medium
  • England and Wales (2007) Wettest ever May to July since records began in 1766
  • Impact Costs: Major flooding causing ~£3
  • Confidence in attribution to climate change: Medium
  • Pakistan (2010) Rainfall records, Worst flooding in its history
  • Impact Costs: nearly 3000 deaths, affected 20 million people
  • Confidence in attribution to climate change: Low to Medium
  • Eastern Australia (2010), Highest December rainfall ever recorded since 1900
  • Impact Costs: Brisbane flooding in Jan 2011, costing 23 lives and estimated US$ 2.55 billion
  • Confidence in attribution to climate change: Low to Medium