Haiti – 140,000 Still Homeless After Hurricane Matthew

Over 140,000 people remain homeless in Haiti after Hurricane Matthew, according to the latest update from the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (UNOCHA).

Hurricane Matthew made landfall as a Category 4 hurricane near Les Anglais in the Sud Department of Haiti during the morning of 04 October 2016.

The storm and ensuing damage resulted in the country’s largest humanitarian emergency since the 2010 earthquake. It caused extensive flooding and mudslides, damage to road infrastructure and buildings, as well as electricity and water shortages.

Over 500 Dead

The latest figures from the governmental Directorate of Civil Protection (DPC) of Haiti have confirmed 546 deaths and 438 injured as a result of the hurricane.

140,000 Without Homes, 116,000 Without School

Over three weeks since the hurricane struck, the number of displaced stands at 141,493. Those displaced are living in 204 temporary shelters. Almost 800 schools in the affected areas are damaged or destroyed, leaving 116,000 children without education.

Humanitarian and Food Assistance

UNOCHA adds that 1.4 million humanitarian assistance, more than 40 per cent are children who are mainly in the Grand’Anse and Sud Departments. Of the 1.4 million, UNOCHA say that over 800,000 people urgently require food assistance.

Cholera

In the wake of Hurricane Matthew, health officials in Haiti said they were preparing for a likely surge in cholera cases after the storm had severely damaged water supplies and sanitation systems.

UNOCHA says that, between 04 to 24 October, 3,423 suspected cholera cases were reported, including 1,065 in Sud and 752 in Grand’Anse Departments.

Locals of Anse-d’Hainault stand by as supplies are delivered by Sailors and Marines attached to Joint Task Force Matthew. JTF Matthew is providing humanitarian aid and disaster relief to Haiti following Hurricane Matthew. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Gary J. Ward)
Locals of Anse-d’Hainault stand by as supplies are delivered by Sailors and Marines attached to Joint Task Force Matthew. JTF Matthew is providing humanitarian aid and disaster relief to Haiti following Hurricane Matthew. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Gary J. Ward)
A Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron 28 (HSC-28 ) pilot looks down at the aftermath of Hurricane Matthew from an MH-60S Seahawk. USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7) and the 24th Marine Expeditionary Unit are providing disaster relief and humanitarian aid to Haiti following Hurricane Matthew. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Petty Officer Christopher Adams)
A Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron 28 (HSC-28 ) pilot looks down at the aftermath of Hurricane Matthew from an MH-60S Seahawk. USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7) and the 24th Marine Expeditionary Unit are providing disaster relief and humanitarian aid to Haiti following Hurricane Matthew. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Petty Officer Christopher Adams)
 An MV-22B Osprey,An MV-22B Osprey, An MV-22B Osprey, assigned to Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 365 (VMM-365) flies over Anse-d’Hainault. JTF Matthew is providing humanitarian aid and disaster relief to Haiti following Hurricane Matthew. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Gary J. Ward)
An MV-22B Osprey,An MV-22B Osprey, An MV-22B Osprey, assigned to Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 365 (VMM-365) flies over Anse-d’Hainault. JTF Matthew is providing humanitarian aid and disaster relief to Haiti following Hurricane Matthew. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Gary J. Ward)